The Facts

Le Canada est une super-puissance pétrolière qui en a importé pour près de 500 milliards $ depuis 31 ans

Le Canada est une super-puissance pétrolière qui en a importé pour près de 500 milliards $ depuis 31 ans

Il est probable que la plupart des citoyens ne savent pas d’où provient le pétrole qu’ils utilisent quotidiennement. Nous avons examiné les données de Statistique Canada pour en savoir plus. Une première découverte : le Canada a importé pour 477 milliards $ de pétrole étranger sur une période de 31 ans, entre 1988 et 2019, soit 587 milliards $ de 2020. Étonnant, tout de même, pour un pays possédant les troisièmes réserves mondiales.
Canada’s ports and energy imports and exports: International comparisons

Canada’s ports and energy imports and exports: International comparisons

Canada’s seaports are key to moving goods and people via logistical supply chains extending to seaports in more than 170 countries and territories throughout the world. They are critical hubs in the nation’s economy, bringing Canada’s goods, including oil, natural gas and fuels, to key markets in the United States, China, Japan, and South Korea, among other countries.
LISTEN: CEC’s Mark Milke on how much foreign oil Canada imports

LISTEN: CEC’s Mark Milke on how much foreign oil Canada imports

Canadian Energy Centre director of research Mark Milke was on the Danielle Smith show to discuss Canada’s ongoing use of foreign oil imports, despite boasting the third largest oil reserves on the planet.
Commentary: Canada is an energy superpower — which imports nearly half a trillion dollars in foreign oil

Commentary: Canada is an energy superpower — which imports nearly half a trillion dollars in foreign oil

Canada is one of the world’s top oil producers with the third-largest proven reserve on the planet. Despite that, Canadians may find it surprising that the country imported nearly 241 million barrels of oil in 2019, with a value of nearly $19 billion. 
Foreign oil imports to Canada: $477 billion between 1988 and 2019

Foreign oil imports to Canada: $477 billion between 1988 and 2019

Despite Canada’s position as one of the world’s top oil producers, with the third-largest oil reserves, crude oil imports into Canada have become a significant part of the country’s energy mix, particularly since 2000.
Importations de pétrole étranger au Canada : 477 milliards de dollars entre 1988 et 2019

Importations de pétrole étranger au Canada : 477 milliards de dollars entre 1988 et 2019

Dans cette fiche d’information (une version PDF peut être téléchargée ici), nous avons utilisé les renseignements de la Base de données sur le commerce international canadien de Statistique Canada pour suivre les flux d’importation de pétrole (c.-à-d. l’huile de pétrole, les huiles obtenues à partir des matériaux bitumineux, le pétrole brut) au Canada entre 1988 et 2019. Ensuite, nous avons analysé la source de ces importations par pays avant de faire une ventilation des importations de pétrole par province et une ventilation des chiffres de 2010 à 2019. Puis, nous avons comparé la valeur des importations de pétrole brut à d’autres importations pour donner un sens aux quantités importantes de pétrole brut¹.
Commentary: Weak oil and gas investment still plagues Canada

Commentary: Weak oil and gas investment still plagues Canada

Over the past decade, one oft-heard claim is that oil and gas is a ‘sunset’ industry, where investment in Canada can be expected to decline given a worldwide flight from oil and investment.
Comparing investment in the oil and gas sector: Canada vs. the world

Comparing investment in the oil and gas sector: Canada vs. the world

In this CEC Fact Sheet (which can be downloaded here as a pdf), we examine trends in oil and gas investment in Canada and other regions around the world.¹ We do so for two reasons. The first is to discover if investment in Canadian oil and gas has followed worldwide trends or departed from them, and if so, where and in what magnitudes. The second reason to examine oil and gas investment trends is that one oft-heard claim is that oil and gas is a “sunset” industry, where investment in Canada can be expected to decline given worldwide secular trends, i.e., a flight from oil and gas to other forms of investment.
Commentary: First Nations don’t oppose energy projects

Commentary: First Nations don’t oppose energy projects

Many people would have us believe Indigenous North Americans are unanimous in their opposition to oil and gas development. Thus Canada has seen protesters from the United States who cite “helping protect Indigenous lands” as their motivation for interfering with oil and gas development projects in this country. Yet Indigenous people in Canada are far from homogeneous. In Canada there fully 633 First Nations, plus the Métis people and the Inuit. In the U.S., there are another 574 Native American groups. Nowhere else on the planet would such a diverse group of peoples be expected to be unanimous on anything.
LISTEN: CEC’s Mark Milke talks emissions intensity and small business

LISTEN: CEC’s Mark Milke talks emissions intensity and small business

Canadian Energy Centre Executive Director of Research Mark Milke joined the Canadian Association of Oilwell Drilling Contractors’ podcast to discuss two recent research papers.